Human Emotions Incorporated: providing

tools to culture Emtional Wisdom, Student Succes and Balance in Life

EQD - The Emotology Q-Deck - $25.00

The Emotology Q-Deck (EQD) is a deck of cards that describes 52 human emotions. The hearts and diamonds describe the spectrum of 26 positive, healthy emotions. The clubs and spades describe the spectrum of 26 negative, stressful emotions. The names of the emotions follow, but each is described and defined with greater phenomenological details in the 52 cards. See Newsletter: EQD Re-creational Games for game rules and procedures.

Blue SuitsRed Suits
ClubsSpadesDiandsHearts
A
Traumatized
Disillusioned
Proud
Spiritual
K
Hurt
Depressed
Powerful
Trusting
Q
Hateful
Suicidal
Self-Confidant
Love
J
Aches & Pains
Disgusted
Successful
Happy
10
Angry
Suspicious
Determined
Affectionate
9
Greedy
Fearful
Vibrant
Humorous
8
Envious
Worried
Enthused
Joyful
7
Jealous
Conflicted
Daring
Playful
6
Pressured
Guilty
Curious
Romantic
5
Frustrated
Confused
Hopeful
Sexually Alive
4
Exhausted
Lonely
Creative
Grateful
3
Irritable
Discontented
Appreciated
Sympathetic
2
Serious
Bored
Relaxed
Content to Die
 
Blue Joker: Aware
 
Red Joker: Expressive
 

 

The initial purpose of the EQD was to measure patterns of emotional life and overall emotional stress balance. Asking the research participants to sort through the deck of 70 emotion cards and to reflect upon the extent to which the emotions have been experienced did this. A set of scale cards was developed to rate the emotions along a 7-point scale. These scale cards range from a “0” for those emotions experienced hardly or not at all, to a “6” for those emotions experienced almost constantly.

 

The Emotology Q-Deck (EQD) began as a psychometric instrument and was found to provide reliable (.95 stability coefficient) and valid (.70 criterion and predictive validity) measures of emotional life patterns (Launier, 1980, 1996). It was based on the Q-sort technique (Block, 1961; Stephensen, 1953), which means that instead of using a questionnaire, items of interest are printed on cards. Individuals then sort through the cards to review what and how they have been feeling.

 

Early experience with both college students and elders living in retirement communities lead to the idea of embedding the emotion cards in a deck of playing cards, to enhance its recreational and educational uses. The original 70-emotions deck was reduced to 52. The hearts and diamonds describe the spectrum of 26 positive, healthy emotions. The clubs and spades describe the spectrum of 26 negative, stressful emotions.

 

The EQD was developed in the tradition of self-help, with an emphasis on social support, and interaction. The EQD games are based on many established principles of psychology: psychodynamic insights of Freud, cognitive-behavioral psychology, higher forms of learning, humanistic development, stress management (Lazarus & Launier, 1979) and the neo-Vygotskian approach to education (Karpov, 2005). The EQD serves to strengthen emotional health and well-being at both individual and collective levels. The EQD recreational manual of psycho-educational games slowly evolved from the suggestions and feedback of players. Having fun, providing social support, challenging team mates, learning together, sharing our discoveries and insights are all part of the EQD games.

 

Block, J. (1978). The Q-sort method in personality assessment and psychiatric research.

Palo Alto, CA: Consulting Psychologists Press, Inc.

Karpov, Y.V. (2005). The neo-Vygotskian approach to child development. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Launier, R. A. (1996). The Emotology Re-creational Guide. Savannah: Human Emotions Incorporated

Launier, R. A. (1980). Human emotions. Their measure and pattern of occurrence in aging. Dissertation Abstracts International. Vol. 40, No. 7, pg. 3371-B.

Lazarus, R. S. and Launier, R. A. (1979). Stress-related transaction between person and environment. In L.A. Pervin and M. Lewis (Eds.) Perspectives in interactional psychology. NY: Plenum.

Stephenson, W. (1953). The study of behavior. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.